ANZAC Day Biscuits

25 Apr

ANZAC (The Australian & New Zealand Army Corps) Day is a national day of remembrance that commemorates and honours all Australians and New Zealanders who served and died in all wars, particularly those who fought at Gallipoli in the Ottoman Empire during World War I. The Australian Prime Minister, The Hon. Tony Abbott MP, said in his address to the nation today

“Today Australians at home and abroad pause to remember all who have served our country.
This is the 99th anniversary of the landing in Gallipoli.
Over coming years, Australians will commemorate the centenary of the Great War and remember the tide of events that shaped our nation and that still cast a shadow over the wider world.
The First World War impacted on Australia like nothing else before or since. It was the crucible that forged our nation.
From a population of just under five million; 417,000 enlisted; 332,000 served overseas; 152,000 were wounded and 61,000 never came home.
Of men aged 18 to 42, almost one in two served in uniform. Of those who served overseas, almost one in five were killed in action. Of the 270,000 who returned, more than half had been wounded – and others had mental scars that never healed.
We will never glorify war. Still, the worst of times can bring out the best in us.
This day we remember all who have served our country – in our Army, Navy and Air Force – and through all conflicts: the Boer War, the First and Second World Wars, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan and everywhere our Armed Forces are sent in our name.
The presence of Australians at Anzac Day events today is a demonstration that we are a nation of memory, not just of memorials. The character of our service men and women has helped to define our nation.
Their courage, mateship and sacrifice has been exemplary.
 
Lest we forget.”

We may only be a small country, in terms of population size, and may not have suffered large scale casualties through all conflicts, wars and peace keeping operations as other nations have, but Anzac Day is probably the most important national occasion, a day that we choose to remember, commemorate and say thank you to our service men and women.

So how do oat biscuits feature on this occasion?

According to the Australian War Memorial, tales are told of Anzac biscuits being sent and eaten by troops in Gallipoli with evidence to suggest that a rolled oats biscuit was sent to troops on the Western Front. Truth be told though, the majority of rolled oats based biscuits were sold and consumed at fetes, galas, parades and other public events at home, to raise funds for the war effort. This connection to the troops serving overseas led to them being referred to as ‘soldier’s biscuits’.

The basic ingredients for an Anzac biscuit were and still are today: rolled oats, sugar, flour, butter and golden syrup. Shredded coconut is now commonly added as well as bicarb soda. Here’s my recipe.

INGREDIENTS

125g butter, chopped coarsely
2 tablespoons golden syrup
¾ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
1 tablespoon boiling water
1 cup (90g) rolled oats
1 cup (90g) desiccated coconut
1 cup (150g) plain flour
¾ cup (165g) brown sugar

METHOD

Preheat oven to 160°C or 140°C fan-forced.
Combine butter and syrup in a small saucepan. Heat gently until butter and syrup melt.
Combine bicarbonate of soda and water in a small bowl and stir into butter mixture.
Combine remaining ingredients in a large bowl. Pour over warm butter mixture and stir well to combine.
Roll rounded teaspoons of mixture into balls – creative license here, make as big or as small as you want. Place on baking paper lined baking trays and flatten slightly.
Bake for 12-15 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from oven and cool 5 minutes on baking trays; transfer to a wire rack to finish cooling.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: